10 Best Safari Destinations In Africa

Africa is a continent of incredible diversity, from its stunning landscapes to its rich and complex cultures. It is a land of contrasts, where vast deserts give way to lush rainforests and bustling cities sit alongside remote tribal villages.

The continent is home to some of the world’s most iconic natural wonders, from the majestic Victoria Falls to the awe-inspiring Mount Kilimanjaro.

But Africa is not just a place of breathtaking scenery. It is also a place of warmth and generosity, where visitors are welcomed with open arms and treated like family.

One of the best ways to experience Africa is by going on a safari. A safari is an adventure that allows you to see the continent’s wildlife in their natural habitat and learn about their behavior, ecology, and conservation.

Whether you want to see the Big Five – lions, leopards, elephants, rhinos, and buffalos – in South Africa, witness the great wildebeest migration in Kenya, or encounter the endangered mountain gorillas in Uganda, there is a safari destination for everyone.

In this article, we will explore some of the best safari destinations in Africa and what makes them unique and unforgettable.

What Are The Best Safari Destinations In Africa?

1. Okavango Delta, Botswana

1. Okavango Delta, Botswana

The Okavango Delta is a vast inland delta in Botswana, where the Okavango River spreads over a large area of the Kalahari Desert, creating a unique wetland ecosystem.

The delta is home to a rich diversity of wildlife, including many endangered and rare species, such as the black rhino, the African wild dog, and the wattled crane.

The delta is also a cultural and historical treasure, as it is inhabited by various ethnic groups, such as the Bayei, the Hambukushu, and the San, who have adapted to the delta’s environment and resources.

The Okavango Delta is divided into three main regions: the Panhandle, the Delta, and the Drylands.

The Panhandle is the northernmost part of the delta, where the river flows in a deep and wide channel, surrounded by swamps and villages.

The Panhandle is a popular destination for fishing, birdwatching, and learning about the local culture and traditions.

The Delta is the central part of the delta, where the river splits into numerous channels, lagoons, pools, and islands.

The Delta is the delta’s most diverse and wildlife-rich area, where visitors can enjoy game viewing, boating, and mokoro (dug-out canoe) safaris.

The Drylands are the southernmost part of the delta, where the water gradually recedes, and the landscape becomes more arid and wooded.

The Drylands are home to many mammals, especially during the dry season, when they seek refuge near the remaining water sources.

The Okavango Delta is a dynamic and seasonal system influenced by the annual flood cycle of the Okavango River.

The flood originates from the summer rainfall in the Angolan highlands and reaches the delta between March and June, peaking in July and August.

The flood transforms the delta into a lush and fertile oasis, attracting millions of animals and birds from the surrounding drylands.

The flood also creates a variety of habitats and ecological zones, from permanent swamps to seasonal grasslands, each with its flora and fauna.

The flood recedes between September and February, leaving smaller water bodies and drylands offering different wildlife viewing opportunities and challenges.

The Okavango Delta is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the world’s most exclusive and pristine wilderness destinations.

It offers a range of safari experiences, from luxury lodges to mobile camps, catering to different budgets and preferences.

The delta is also a place of conservation and research, as it faces various threats and challenges, such as climate change, poaching, human-wildlife conflict, and development.

The delta is managed by various stakeholders, including the government, the communities, the private sector, and the NGOs, who work together to protect and sustain this natural wonder.

2. Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya

2. Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya

The Masai Mara National Reserve is one of Africa’s most famous and popular safari destinations. It is located southwest of Kenya, along the border with Tanzania.

It is named after the Maasai people, the traditional inhabitants of the area, and the word “mara,” which means “spotted” in their language. This refers to the acacia trees and bushes that dot the landscape.

The reserve covers an area of about 1,510 square kilometers and is part of the larger Mara-Serengeti ecosystem, which spans over 25,000 square kilometers.

The reserve is known for its diverse and abundant wildlife, especially the large populations of lions, leopards, cheetahs, elephants, buffalos, rhinos, and other herbivores.

It is also the stage for the annual Great Migration when millions of wildebeest, zebra, and gazelle cross the Mara River from the Serengeti in search of fresh grass and water.

This is one of the most spectacular natural phenomena in the world and attracts thousands of visitors every year.

The reserve has a variety of habitats, from open savanna plains to rolling hills, woodlands, rivers, and swamps.

The climate is mild and pleasant, with average temperatures ranging from 20°C to 30°C and two rainy seasons, from November to December and from March to May.

The reserve is divided into two sections, the Mara Triangle and the Narok County, which are managed by different authorities.

The Mara Triangle is the western part of the reserve, administered by the Mara Conservancy.

This non-profit organization works with the local community to protect and conserve wildlife and the environment.

Narok County is the eastern part of the reserve, controlled by the Narok County Council, which collects park fees and allocates them to various projects and services.

The reserve offers a range of safari experiences, from budget to luxury and from self-drive to guided tours.

Visitors can stay in campsites, lodges, or tented camps and enjoy game drives, walking safaris, balloon safaris, cultural visits, and more.

The reserve is also home to several research and conservation projects, such as the Mara Predator Project, the Mara Elephant Project, and the Mara Cheetah Project, which aim to monitor and protect endangered species and their habitats.

The reserve also works closely with the Maasai community, which lives harmoniously with the wildlife and practices its traditional pastoral lifestyle.

The Maasai are known for their colorful attire, beadwork, dances, and ceremonies, and they offer visitors a glimpse into their rich and ancient culture.

3. Kruger National Park, South Africa

3. Kruger National Park, South Africa

Kruger National Park is one of Africa’s largest and most famous national parks, covering 19,500 square kilometers northeast of South Africa.

It is home to a remarkable diversity of wildlife, including the Big Five (lions, leopards, elephants, rhinos, and buffalos) and many other mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, and plants.

The park is also of historical and cultural significance. It contains evidence of human occupation dating back to the Stone Age, as well as rock art, archaeological sites, and monuments.

The park is divided into 14 ecozones, each with its characteristics and attractions. Some of the most popular ecozones are:

  • The Southern Region

This is the most accessible and visited part of the park, as it has the highest concentration of animals and the best road network.

It includes the camps of Skukuza, Lower Sabie, Pretoriuskop, Berg-en-Dal, and Crocodile Bridge.

Some of the highlights of this region are the granite outcrops of the Malelane and Berg-en-Dal areas, the scenic Sabie River, the Lebombo Mountains, and the Renosterkoppies Dam.

  • The Central Region

This is the park’s heart, where large herds of grazers and predators dominate the open savanna plains. It includes the camps of Satara, Orpen, Olifants, and Letaba.

Some of the attractions of this region are the N’wanetsi and Timbavati rivers, the Olifants Gorge, the S100 road, and the Masorini and Thulamela archaeological sites.

  • The Northern Region

This is the most remote and least visited part of the park, where the landscape becomes more arid and rugged, and the wildlife more scarce and elusive.

It includes the camps of Mopani, Shingwedzi, and Punda Maria. Some of the features of this region are the Shingwedzi and Luvuvhu rivers, the Baobab Hill, the Pafuri picnic site, and the Crooks Corner, where the borders of South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Mozambique meet.

The park offers a range of safari experiences, from self-drive to guided tours and from budget to luxury accommodation.

Visitors can stay in rest camps, bushveld camps, bush lodges, or satellite camps and enjoy game drives, walking safaris, night drives, mountain biking, golfing, and more. 

The park is also a place of conservation and research, as it faces various threats and challenges, such as poaching, climate change, human-wildlife conflict, and invasive species.

The South African National Parks (SANParks) manages the park and collaborates with various stakeholders, such as the government, the communities, the private sector, and the NGOs. 

The park is part of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park, a peace park that links it with the Gonarezhou National Park in Zimbabwe and the Limpopo National Park in Mozambique.

The park is also part of the Kruger to Canyons Biosphere, a UNESCO-designated area that promotes sustainable development and biodiversity conservation.

4. Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

4. Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

The Serengeti National Park is one of Africa’s most famous and popular safari destinations. Located in northern Tanzania.

It covers an area of 14,763 square kilometers (5,700 square miles) and is part of the larger Serengeti ecosystem, which spans over 25,000 square kilometers (9,700 square miles) and includes several other game reserves. The park was established in 1951 and has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1981.

The park is known for its diverse and abundant wildlife, especially the large populations of lions, leopards, cheetahs, elephants, buffalos, rhinos, and other herbivores.

It is also the stage for the annual Great Migration when millions of wildebeest, zebra, and gazelle cross the Mara River from the Serengeti for fresh grass and water.

This is one of the most spectacular natural phenomena in the world and attracts thousands of visitors every year.

The park has a variety of habitats, from open savanna plains to rolling hills, woodlands, rivers, and swamps.

The climate is mild and pleasant, with average temperatures ranging from 20°C to 30°C (68°F to 86°F).

There are two rainy seasons: November to December and March to May. The park is divided into two sections, the Mara Triangle and the Narok County, which are managed by different authorities. 

The Mara Triangle is the western part of the park, administered by the Mara Conservancy.

This non-profit organization works with the local community to protect and conserve wildlife and the environment.

Narok County is the eastern part of the park, controlled by the Narok County Council, which collects park fees and allocates them to various projects and services.

The park offers a range of safari experiences, from budget to luxury and from self-drive to guided tours.

Visitors can stay in campsites, lodges, or tented camps and enjoy activities such as game drives, walking safaris, balloon safaris, cultural visits, and more. 

The park is also home to several research and conservation projects, such as the Serengeti Lion Project, the Serengeti Cheetah Project, and the Serengeti Elephant Project, which aim to monitor and protect the endangered species and their habitats.

The park also works closely with the Maasai community, who live harmoniously with the wildlife and practice their traditional pastoral lifestyle.

The Maasai are known for their colorful attire, beadwork, dances, and ceremonies, and they offer visitors a glimpse into their rich and ancient culture.

5. Etosha National Park, Namibia

5. Etosha National Park, Namibia

Etosha National Park is a nature conservation area in northern Namibia and one of Africa’s most significant game reserves.

It covers an area of nearly 22,912 square kilometers and is completely fenced to protect the animals.

The park’s main characteristic is a large salt pan that can be seen from space, covering 23% of its total area. Etosha means “Great White Place” in the local Oshindonga language.

The park is home to hundreds of species of animals and birds, including many endangered and rare species, such as the black rhino, the African wild dog, and the wattled crane.

The park is especially famous for its large concentrations of wildlife congregating around the waterholes, especially during the dry season, when water is scarce.

Visitors can see elephants, giraffes, lions, cheetahs, leopards, zebras, wildebeests, and many more as they drink, bathe, and interact with each other.

The park is also a paradise for birdwatchers, as it hosts more than 340 bird species, from flamingos and pelicans to eagles and vultures.

The park has a variety of habitats, from arid and wooded areas to grasslands and wetlands.

The climate is mild and pleasant, with average temperatures ranging from 20°C to 30°C and two rainy seasons, from November to December and from March to May.

The park is divided into four regions, each with its characteristics and attractions. These are:

  • The Southern Region

This is the most accessible and visited part of the park, as it has the highest concentration of animals and the best road network.

It includes the camps of Okaukuejo, Halali, and Namutoni, which offer various types of accommodation, from camping to chalets overlooking floodlit waterholes.

One of the highlights of this region is the Etosha pan, which is often dry and cracked but sometimes fills with water and attracts thousands of flamingos and other waterbirds.

The Andoni plains are home to ostriches, springboks, oryx, and the Fischer’s pan, a seasonal wetland that supports a variety of wildlife and plants.

  • The Central Region

This is the park’s heart, where large herds of grazers and predators dominate the open savanna plains.

It includes the camp of Okondeka, a basic campsite with no facilities but offers spectacular views of the wildlife and the landscape.

Some of the attractions of this region are the Okondeka waterhole, which is one of the best places to see lions and other predators.

The Olifantsbad waterhole, which elephants, rhinos, and buffalos frequent, and the Salvadora and Sueda loops, which are scenic routes that offer diverse wildlife viewing opportunities.

  • The Eastern Region

This is the most remote and least visited part of the park, where the landscape becomes more arid and rugged, and the wildlife more scarce and elusive.

It includes the Onkoshi camp, an exclusive, eco-friendly camp that offers stunning views of the pan and the sunrise.

One of the features of this region is the Namutoni Fort, a historical landmark built by the Germans in 1903 that now serves as a museum and a lookout point.

The Klein Namutoni waterhole is a good place to see black-faced impala and other antelopes, and the Dik-Dik drive is a short loop that passes through a dense mopane forest named after the tiny antelope.

  • The Western Region

This park’s newest and most exclusive part was opened to the public in 2011. It includes the Dolomite, a luxury camp that offers panoramic views of the western plains and hills.

One of the features of this region is the Olifantsrus waterhole, the only waterhole in the park with an underground hide where visitors can observe the wildlife at eye level.

The Klip-pan waterhole is a good place to see black rhinos and other rare species, and the Western Etosha pan is a large and isolated section of the pan that tourists seldom visit.

Etosha National Park offers a range of safari experiences, from self-drive to guided tours and from budget to luxury accommodation.

Visitors can enjoy game drives, walking safaris, night drives, mountain biking, and more.

The park is also a place of conservation and research, as it faces various threats and challenges, such as poaching, climate change, human-wildlife conflict, and invasive species.

The Ministry of Environment and Tourism manages the park in collaboration with various stakeholders, such as the government, the communities, the private sector, and the NGOs.

The park is part of the Greater Etosha Landscape, which aims to promote sustainable development and biodiversity conservation in the surrounding areas.

6. Victoria Falls, Zambia and Zimbabwe

6. Victoria Falls, Zambia and Zimbabwe

Victoria Falls is a waterfall on the Zambezi River that forms the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe.

It is one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World and one of the largest waterfalls in the world, with a width of 1,708 meters (5,604 feet) and a height of 108 meters (354 feet).

The waterfall produces a huge spray and a roar that can be seen and heard from a distance, earning it the local name Mosi-oa-Tunya, which means “The Smoke That Thunders.”

The waterfall has two main sections: the Main Falls and the Devil’s Cataract, separated by Boaruka Island.

The Main Falls are the largest and most impressive part of the waterfall, where most of the water plunges into a deep gorge.

The Devil’s Cataract is a smaller and lower part of the waterfall, where the water flows over a rocky ledge.

The gorge below the waterfall is called the First Gorge. It is connected to a series of other gorges that form the Batoka Gorge, which stretches for about 120 kilometers (75 miles) downstream.

The waterfall is a popular tourist attraction, as it offers spectacular views and various activities, such as bungee jumping, white-water rafting, kayaking, zip-lining, and helicopter flights.

The waterfall can be accessed from Zambia and Zimbabwe, and several viewing points and trails are on both sides of the river.

Two bridges span the gorge: the Victoria Falls Bridge, built in 1905 carrying road and rail traffic, and the Knife-Edge Bridge, a footbridge leading to Knife-Edge Point, a close-up view of the Main Falls.

The waterfall is also a place of cultural and historical significance. For centuries, it was a sacred site for the locals and a source of inspiration for many explorers, artists, and writers.

The Scottish missionary and explorer David Livingstone was the first European to see the waterfall; they named it after Queen Victoria in 1855. 

The waterfall is now part of the Mosi-oa-Tunya/Victoria Falls National Park in Zambia and the Victoria Falls National Park in Zimbabwe, both UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

The parks protect the wildlife and environment around the waterfall, as well as the area’s cultural and archaeological heritage.

7. Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda

7. Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda

Volcanoes National Park is a national park in northwestern Rwanda where you can see the endangered mountain gorillas and the golden monkeys in their natural habitat.

The park covers 160 square kilometers of rainforest and includes five of the eight volcanoes in the Virunga Mountains: Karisimbi, Bisoke, Muhabura, Gahinga, and Sabyinyo.

It is part of the larger Virunga Conservation Area, extending into Congo and Uganda.

The park was established in 1925 to protect the gorillas from poaching and was later expanded to include other wildlife and habitats.

The park became famous for the work of the American primatologist Dian Fossey, who set up the Karisoke Research Centre in 1967 and dedicated her life to studying and conserving the gorillas.

She was killed by unknown assailants in 1985 and is buried in the park near her research center. Her story was portrayed in the movie Gorillas in the Mist.

The park offers a range of safari experiences, from budget to luxury and from self-drive to guided tours.

The park’s main attraction is the gorilla trekking, which allows visitors to spend an hour with one of the 12 habituated gorilla groups in the park.

The gorilla trekking permits are limited and expensive and must be booked in advance.

The park offers other activities, such as golden monkey tracking, hiking to the volcanoes or the Dian Fossey tomb, visiting the Iby’Iwacu cultural village, and more.

The park is also a place of conservation and research, as it faces various threats and challenges, such as habitat loss, poaching, human-wildlife conflict, and climate change.

The Rwanda Development Board manages the park, collaborating with various stakeholders, such as the government, the communities, the private sector, and the NGOs.

The park is part of the Greater Virunga Transboundary Collaboration, which promotes peace and cooperation among the three countries that share the Virunga Mountains.

8. Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania

8. Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania

The Ngorongoro Conservation Area is a protected and UNESCO World Heritage Site in northern Tanzania. It is home to various wildlife, landscapes, and cultural heritage.

The main attraction is the Ngorongoro Crater, the world’s largest intact and unfilled volcanic caldera.

The crater hosts many animals, including the endangered black rhino, the majestic lion, and the graceful flamingo. 

You can explore the crater floor on a game drive or venture to the other volcanic calderas in the area, such as Empakaai and Olmoti, where you can enjoy scenic views and hiking trails.

The area is also home to the Maasai people, who have preserved their traditional way of life for centuries.

You can visit their villages, learn about their customs, and witness their colorful ceremonies.

The area covers 8,292 square kilometers and includes five of the eight volcanoes in the Virunga Mountains: Karisimbi, Bisoke, Muhabura, Gahinga, and Sabyinyo.

The area has a variety of habitats, from arid and wooded areas to grasslands and wetlands.

The climate is mild and pleasant, with average temperatures ranging from 20°C to 30°C and two rainy seasons, from November to December and from March to May.

The area is divided into four regions, each with its characteristics and attractions. These are:

  • The Southern Region

This is the most accessible and visited part of the area, as it has the highest concentration of animals and the best road network.

It includes the camps of Okaukuejo, Halali, and Namutoni, which offer various types of accommodation, from camping to chalets overlooking floodlit waterholes.

One of the highlights of this region is the Etosha pan, which is often dry and cracked but sometimes fills with water and attracts thousands of flamingos and other waterbirds.

The Andoni plains are home to ostriches, springboks, oryx, and the Fischer’s pan, a seasonal wetland that supports a variety of wildlife and plants.

  • The Central Region

This is the heart of the area, where large herds of grazers and predators dominate the open savanna plains.

It includes the camp of Okondeka, a basic campsite with no facilities but offers spectacular views of the wildlife and the landscape.

Some of the attractions of this region are the Okondeka waterhole, which is one of the best places to see lions and other predators.

The Olifantsbad waterhole, which elephants, rhinos, and buffalos frequent, and the Salvadora and Sueda loops, which are scenic routes that offer diverse wildlife viewing opportunities.

  • The Eastern Region

This is the most remote and least visited part of the area, where the landscape becomes more arid and rugged, and the wildlife more scarce and elusive.

It includes the Onkoshi camp, an exclusive, eco-friendly camp that offers stunning views of the pan and the sunrise. 

One of the features of this region is the Namutoni Fort, a historical landmark built by the Germans in 1903 that now serves as a museum and a lookout point.

The Klein Namutoni waterhole is a good place to see black-faced impala and other antelopes, and the Dik-Dik drive is a short loop that passes through a dense mopane forest named after the tiny antelope.

  • The Western Region

This area’s newest and most exclusive part opened to the public in 2011.

It includes the Dolomite luxury camp that offers panoramic views of the western plains and hills.

One of the features of this region is the Olifantsrus waterhole, the only waterhole in the area with an underground hide where visitors can observe the wildlife at eye level.

The Klip-pan waterhole is a good place to see black rhinos and other rare species, and the Western Etosha pan is a large and isolated section of the pan that tourists seldom visit.

The area offers a range of safari experiences, from self-drive to guided tours and from budget to luxury accommodation.

Visitors can enjoy game drives, walking safaris, night drives, mountain biking, and more.

The area is also a place of conservation and research, as it faces various threats and challenges, such as poaching, climate change, human-wildlife conflict, and invasive species. 

The Ngorongoro Conservation Area Authority manages the area, in collaboration with various stakeholders, such as the government, communities, the private sector, and NGOs.

It is part of the Greater Ngorongoro Landscape, which aims to promote sustainable development and biodiversity conservation in the surrounding areas.

9. Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda

9. Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda

Bwindi Impenetrable National Park is a national park in southwestern Uganda where you can see the endangered mountain gorillas and the golden monkeys in their natural habitat.

The park covers 160 square kilometers of rainforest and includes five of the eight volcanoes in the Virunga Mountains: Karisimbi, Bisoke, Muhabura, Gahinga, and Sabyinyo.

The park is part of the larger Virunga Conservation Area, which spans Congo and Uganda.

The park was established in 1991 and has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1994.

It is home to about 400 mountain gorillas, which make up half of the world’s population of this critically endangered species.

The park also hosts 120 mammal species, 350 bird species, 220 butterfly species, 27 frog species, and over 1,000 plant species, making it one of the most biodiverse forests in Africa.

The park offers a range of safari experiences, from budget to luxury and from self-drive to guided tours.

The main attraction is gorilla trekking, which allows visitors to spend an hour with one of the park’s 12 habituated gorilla groups.

The gorilla trekking permits are limited and expensive and must be booked in advance.

The park offers other activities, such as golden monkey tracking, hiking to the volcanoes or the Dian Fossey tomb, visiting the Iby’Iwacu cultural village, and more.

The park is also a place of conservation and research, as it faces various threats and challenges, such as habitat loss, poaching, human-wildlife conflict, and climate change.

The Uganda Wildlife Authority and stakeholders such as the government, the communities, the private sector, and the NGOs manage the park.

The park is part of the Greater Virunga Transboundary Collaboration, which promotes peace and cooperation among the three countries that share the Virunga Mountains.

10. Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

10. Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy is a private conservancy dedicated to wildlife conservation and community development in northern Kenya.

It covers an area of 253 square kilometers and is part of the larger Laikipia ecosystem, which spans over 9,500 square kilometers and includes several other wildlife areas.

The conservancy was established in 1995 and has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2013.

The conservancy is home to the largest concentration of Grevy’s zebra in the world, as well as black and white rhinos, lions, leopards, elephants, and more.

The conservancy is also a sanctuary for the endangered sitatunga, a semi-aquatic antelope in the wetlands.

The Conservancy hosts over 400 bird species, from ostriches and eagles to sunbirds and weavers.

The conservancy is also a place of cultural and historical interest, as it is inhabited by various ethnic groups, such as the Maasai, the Samburu, and the Turkana, who have their traditions and lifestyles.

The conservancy offers a range of safari experiences, from budget to luxury and from self-drive to guided tours.

Visitors can stay in campsites, lodges, or tented camps and enjoy game drives, walking safaris, camel safaris, horseback riding, and cultural visits.

The conservancy is also a place of conservation and research, as it faces various threats and challenges, such as poaching, climate change, human-wildlife conflict, and habitat loss.

The Lewa Wildlife Conservancy Trust manages the conservancy in collaboration with various stakeholders, such as the government, the communities, the private sector, and the NGOs.

The conservancy is part of the Northern Rangelands Trust, which aims to promote sustainable development and biodiversity conservation in northern Kenya.

FAQ: Best Safari Destinations In Africa

Which African country is the safest for safari?

According to the Global Peace Index, Botswana is the safest country in Africa for safari.

It has a low level of domestic and international conflict, a high level of societal safety and security, and a low level of militarization.

Botswana also offers a variety of safari experiences, from exploring the Okavango Delta to witnessing the Kalahari Desert.

Other safe African countries for safari include Tanzania, Ghana, Namibia, and Mauritius, which the Global Peace Index ranks among the top 10 safest countries in Africa.

These countries have diverse and abundant wildlife, stunning landscapes, and rich cultures to discover.

Which country is the cheapest for safari in Africa?

Some of the cheapest African safari countries are:

South Africa

This country offers a variety of safari experiences, from exploring the Kruger National Park to visiting Cape Town and the Garden Route.

South Africa has a good infrastructure, a favorable exchange rate, and many budget-friendly options for accommodation and transport.

Namibia

This country is ideal for self-drive safaris, as it has well-maintained roads, stunning landscapes, and abundant wildlife.

Namibia also offers cheaper camping safaris than staying in lodges or hotels. The Etosha National Park, the Namib Desert, and the Skeleton Coast can be seen.

Kenya

Kenya is one of the most popular safari destinations in Africa. It has the Masai Mara National Reserve, the Amboseli National Park, and the Lake Nakuru National Park.

Kenya also has a low season from April to June, with lower prices and fewer crowds. You can also find cheap flights, transport, and accommodation options.

What Is The Best Time To Go On A Safari?

The best time to go on a safari depends on the country, the region you want to visit, and the wildlife you want to see.

Generally, the dry season is the best time to go on a safari, as the animals gather around water sources, and the vegetation is less dense, making them easier to spot. 

However, the dry season may vary across different parts of Africa, so you must research before planning your trip.

Here are some general guidelines for the best time to go on a safari in some of the most popular safari destinations in Africa:

Botswana

The dry season in Botswana is from May to October, and this is the best time to see wildlife in the Okavango Delta, the Chobe National Park, and the Kalahari Desert.

The wet season is from November to April, and this is the best time to see birds and baby animals and enjoy lower prices and fewer crowds.

Kenya

The dry season in Kenya is from June to October, and this is the best time to see the Great Migration of wildebeest and zebra in the Masai Mara National Reserve and other wildlife in the Amboseli National Park and the Lake Nakuru National Park.

The wet season is from November to May, and this is the best time to see green landscapes, flowers, and birds and enjoy lower prices and fewer crowds.

Best time to visit Kenya.

Namibia

The dry season in Namibia is from June to October, and this is the best time to see wildlife in the Etosha National Park, the Namib Desert, and the Skeleton Coast.

The wet season is from November to May, and this is the best time to see green landscapes, flowers, and birds and enjoy lower prices and fewer crowds.

South Africa

The dry season in South Africa is from May to September, and this is the best time to see wildlife in the Kruger National Park, the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, and the Hluhluwe-Imfolozi Park.

The wet season is from October to April, and this is the best time to see green landscapes, flowers, and birds and enjoy lower prices and fewer crowds.

Tanzania

The dry season in Tanzania is from June to October, and this is the best time to see wildlife in the Serengeti National Park, the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, and the Tarangire National Park.

The wet season is from November to May, and this is the best time to see wildebeest and zebra calving in the Serengeti, as well as green landscapes, flowers, and birds.

Best time to visit Tanzania.

Uganda

The dry season in Uganda is from June to August and from December to February, and this is the best time to see wildlife in the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, the Queen Elizabeth National Park, and the Murchison Falls National Park.

The wet season is from March to May and from September to November, and it is the best time to see green landscapes, flowers, and birds, as well as to enjoy lower prices and fewer crowds.

Is Kenya or South Africa better for safari?

Here are some general comparisons between Kenya and South Africa for safari:

  • Wildlife

Both countries offer diverse and abundant wildlife, especially the Big Five (lions, leopards, elephants, rhinos, and buffalos).

However, Kenya has more land dedicated to national parks and wildlife reserves. The Masai Mara National Reserve is the best place to witness the Great Migration of millions of wildebeest and zebra.

South Africa has more private reserves, such as Sabi Sands and Tswalu Kalahari, which offer a more exclusive and intimate safari experience.

  • Accessibility

Both countries are easy to visit for travelers from many countries, as they have good infrastructure, favorable exchange rates, and visa options.

Kenya has an electronic visa (eVisa) available for visitors of most nationalities, which can be obtained online before traveling.

South Africa has no eVisa system yet, but citizens of around 70 countries can visit visa-free for up to 90 days.

  • Comfort

Both countries offer a range of safari experiences, from budget to luxury and from self-drive to guided tours.

However, South Africa is more family-friendly and comfortable than Kenya, as it has more facilities, amenities, and activities for all ages and tastes.

Kenya is more authentic and adventurous than South Africa, as it offers a more wildlife-focused and immersive experience in the wilds of Africa.

Key Takeaways: Best Safari Destinations In Africa

Africa is a continent that offers endless possibilities for adventure, discovery, and inspiration.

Whether you want to see the majestic wildlife, the stunning landscapes, or the rich cultures, there is a safari destination for you.

From the famous parks of Kenya and Tanzania to the lesser-known reserves of Namibia and Rwanda, you can find a safari experience that suits your budget, preferences, and expectations.

No matter where you go, you will be amazed by Africa’s beauty and diversity and create memories that will last a lifetime.

However, going on a safari is not only about enjoying the sights and sounds of nature.

It is also about supporting the conservation and development efforts of the local communities and organizations that work hard to protect and sustain this natural wonder.

By choosing a responsible and ethical safari operator, you can contribute to the preservation and restoration of Africa’s wildlife and habitats and the empowerment and well-being of its people.

Going on a safari is not only a privilege but also a responsibility that you will not regret.

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